It is, however, John Austin as Ned Seton who,

through much skill and no fault of his own,

almost runs away with the show. 

Review of Holiday, Broadway World

John Austin supplies deadpan humor —

through just the right manner of holding a glass, or making an entrance —

while also capturing the character’s pathos.

Review of Holiday, Washington Post

Austin, through his expressive eyes, glances at deeper issues.

Review of Holiday, DC Theater Arts

Austin is quietly devastating as an heir trying to escape his destiny. 

Review of Holiday, Talkin' Broadway

There's something about Ned's combined sly humor, fatalism, childish stubbornness, grim self-knowledge, and hopelessness that uneasily pings the viewer's funny bone, conscience, and fear all at once. Austin hits the timing of his hilarious advances and retreats just right.

Review of Holiday, Broadway World

...the sardonic brother, Ned (a wonderful John Austin)... 

Review of Holiday, MD Theatre Guide

...played arrestingly by John Austin...

Review of Right to Be Forgotten, Broadway World

John Austin as the youngest Zeus... is a revelation.

Review of Zeus in Therapy, CTX Live Theatre

John Austin brings crisp definition to Frank, a decorous tailor.

Review of Melancholy Play, The Washington Post

Austin also brings subtle comedy to Derril's most straightforward and sincere delivery,

ensuring he is endeared to the audience.

Review of Right to Be Forgotten, Broadway World

A theatrical powerhouse with physical skill, emotional depth, and voracious appetite for ideas.
Gary Jaffe, Director of Zeus in Therapy

A shape-shifter, a chameleon.
Mona Lee Fultz, Actress, Juilliard Graduate, Founder of Britelites Acting Studio

The real deal as an actor.
Nick Hutchison, London and American Actor, Director, and Lecturer